Popularized by the documentary Forks Over Knives, the Ornish diet is a low-fat, plant-based diet plan based on whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. It's based on a lacto-ovo style of vegetarianism, allowing only egg whites and nonfat dairy products. It's packed with vitamins, fiber, and lots of filling plants to keep you satiated. Some studies have shown it can reverse heart disease and have beneficial effects on other chronic health conditions. (BTW, there is a difference between a vegan diet and a plant-based diet.)

The BellyProof system prides itself on being unique in that field. We dis-engage from pointless discussion about calories and metabolism. We do so while backing it up with some, hard to ignore, scientific evidence. We argue that the best way to lose fat is to follow the biological sequence. This means getting you to break fat, before attempting to burn it.


I'm 15, 5'0 and 108lbs. In early January I was at 98lbs with a thigh gap. I joined a weight training class and gained ten pounds of muscle, the majority of it in my legs totally ruining the thigh gap I once had. I have been able to lose a couple of pounds but from there nothing else is working. I've been on the Mediterranean diet since I was 8 sp I know a food change isn't my issue. Is there a way to lose the last 8lbs of muscle to get my thigh gap back?

As with many foods, there are healthy versions and ones that make promises they can’t deliver. Some bars that promise “pure protein” have the same nutritional value as a candy bar, so it’s important to research before purchasing. Rather than just counting calories, check out the actual ingredients; is it made up of real food? Skip protein bars for weight loss that include soy in favor of ones that use proteins that include leucine, valine and isoleucine. The protein, plus the fiber and fat, will be what plays a key role in keeping you full throughout the day.
When fat loss is the goal, planning a good mix of workouts is key. Gary suggests incorporating a combination of strength training, high- and moderate-intensity cardio and something to help relax the muscles. “I’ll train my clients hard on the strength training and high-intensity cardio side of things, then suggest they get to a good yoga or pilates class and fit in a run or sign up for a spin class,” he says.
If you follow food trends, you might think you have to fall in love with cauliflower and kale to reap all the rewards that veggies offer, but that isn’t the case. Be it broccoli, sweet potatoes, carrots, red peppers, cabbage, spinach, or any other vegetable, the idea is to eat a variety of them and find plenty of ways to enjoy their goodness. So if you just can’t stomach steamed Brussels sprouts, try them roasted, or give sautéed Brussels sprouts a try. If raw zucchini isn’t your thing, see if you like it spiralized into noodles or grilled on a grill pan.
Part of slimming down involves a simple, sensible exercise and an easy-to-follow nutrition plan. This full week of meals will take the guesswork out of grocery shopping and prepping with nutritionist-approved breakfast, lunch, and dinner ideas. If you have a higher activity level, check out these 1,300-, 1,400-, 1,500-, and 1,800-calorie meal plans as well.
Americans are getting less sleep than ever these days and it’s taking a toll on our health—most visibly on our waistlines. Losing just 30 minutes of sleep per night can make you gain weight, according to a study done by the Endocrine Society. Worse, that weight is more likely to go straight to your tummy. Instead, the researchers found, the best sleep cycle is one that follows your natural circadian rhythms, which means sleeping and waking around the same time as the sun. Here are the 7 ways to banish belly bloat in your sleep.
×